TTnight Large Capacity Cycling Bike Bicycle Commuting Saddle Bag Tail Bag Strap On Reflective Seat Pack (Black)

TTnight Large Capacity Cycling Bike Bicycle Commuting Saddle Bag Tail Bag Strap On Reflective Seat Pack (Black)

TTnight Large Capacity Cycling Bike Bicycle Commuting Saddle Bag Tail Bag Strap On Reflective Seat Pack (Black)
@
Features:
Material: 300D polyester
Type: Bike tail bag with super large volume
Size: 25 x 16 x 9cm

Suitable for: Foldable Bike Folding Bike. It could be fixed under the saddle, simple and spacious shape, super large inner capacity.
Spacious interior room to put articles, not only spring water but also other objects such as inner tire, bicycle repairing tools and purse.
Unique opening design the newest double zipper + magic design
Double pocket in the side edge to carry objects such as tool, key.
Narrow goods + Cargo Lash Installment.
Logo reflecting light+ Light band adds safer guarantee for riding.

Package:
1x Bicycle Saddle Tail Bag

  • Material: 300D polyester
  • Size: 25 x 16 x 9cm
  • A bicycle saddle bag that is perfect for short journeys
  • Water-repellent cycle bag, easy to clean and spacious enough for essentials
  • Simple to attach seat pack, easy to access, simple to remove

List Price: $ 19.99

Price: $ 13.74

Bicycle Commuting

Promoting Walking and Cycling: New Perspectives on Sustainable Travel

Promoting Walking and Cycling: New Perspectives on Sustainable Travel
@ Why, despite the supposed desirability of cycling and walking, do so many people feel unable or unwilling to incorporate these modes of transport into their everyday journeys? This problem, one of the most pressing questions facing transport planners, has major implications for environmental policy, urban planning, and existing social and economic structures. Drawing on original research, the authors reveal the reasons behind our resistance and suggest evidence-based policy solutions that could significantly increase levels of walking and cycling. These informed perspectives will enlighten urban planners and policymakers, as well as students and scholars of transport and mobility issues.

List Price: $ 115.00

Price: $ 114.36

Bicycle Commuting

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2 Responses to “TTnight Large Capacity Cycling Bike Bicycle Commuting Saddle Bag Tail Bag Strap On Reflective Seat Pack (Black)”

  1. 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Needs improvement, July 14, 2016
    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: TTnight Large Capacity Cycling Bike Bicycle Commuting Saddle Bag Tail Bag Strap On Reflective Seat Pack (Black)
    Bag is a nice size for commuting and long rides. However, both zippers get stuck on an inside rib of the flap and the tail light mount is too low. The tail mount loop should be where the logo is to not point too much downwards.
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  2. 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Persuasive research on a key transport issue, November 3, 2013
    By
    T. Ryder (Norfolk, UK) –
    (REAL NAME)

    This monograph is based on extensive quantitative and qualitative research in four English towns and cities, and aims to identify policies at the local or national level that could increase the number of people willing to walk or cycle when making short urban journeys. The quantity of research is impressive, and the authors’ arguments are well structured and persuasive. The research yields a number of intriguing insights: for example, the authors demonstrate that, even in areas of England where “utility cycling” is relatively common, most cyclists still perceive themselves to be part of a marginalised group; this compares starkly with studies in Europe that have revealed the extent to which cyclists believe they are conforming to a societal norm. The authors are under no illusions regarding the size of the challenge that addressing such perceptual issues in the UK represents.
    I was surprised by the extent to which the authors consider walking and cycling largely in isolation from other forms of `sustainable’ transport, although they recognise that integrating all such forms of transport is essential. They also acknowledge that not only are walking and cycling not necessarily a natural pairing, they are actually fundamentally different modes of travel, and at times the authors’ focus on these two modes at the expense of, for example, tram and suburban-train networks comes across as somewhat detached from the realities of urban transport planning.
    The authors make a number of policy proposals they believe are essential if real change is to occur. They recognise that while it should be possible to achieve some of these in the short to medium term, some – for example, “the provision of cycle storage in most homes” – would require a number of agencies to undertake a huge amount of work in order to be implemented. The authors develop their conclusions to a certain point, but arguably they are in fact setting out an agenda for further research: any reader interested in how, for example, the “provision of fully segregated cycle routes on all arterial and other busy roads” could be achieved in their home town will not find an implementation plan here. Nonetheless, the book is so rich with research findings and constructive ideas that I am sure policymakers, academics and those interested in transport planning generally will all find reading the book highly worthwhile.
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