Cycling Along Europe’s Rivers: Bicycle Touring Made Easy and Affordable

Cycling Along Europe’s Rivers: Bicycle Touring Made Easy and Affordable

Cycling Along Europe's Rivers: Bicycle Touring Made Easy and Affordable
@ Over 25 Interesting, Historic, and Cultural Rides. Updated 2015. Cycling Along Europe’s Rivers is a “How To” book on taking self-guided bike trips to Europe that are affordable and easy to organize. The book is based on the author’s extensive experience, including over 20 years of annual cycle trips to Europe. Rhine River, Danube River, Elbe River, Loire River, Po River, Neckar River, Mosel River, Main River, and more. • How to plan and prepare. • How to get what you need to the start of a ride and home again –bikes, panniers, and you. • What to bring and what not — how to keep your load small. • How to handle getting around and other logistics. • Bike, Lodging and Eating advice. • Safety, Security, and Communication advice. • Route recommendations and key features. In short, everything you need to know to have a first-class, comfortable, flexible, and interesting riding trip to Europe without spending a fortune or going with an organized package. We b

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Bicycle Touring

Belgrade is the capital and largest city of Serbia. It is located at the confluence of the Sava and Danube rivers, where the Pannonian Plain meets the Balkans. Its name translates to White city. The city proper has a population of over 2 million people.

One of the most important prehistoric cultures of Europe, the Vinča culture, evolved within the Belgrade area in the 6th millennium BC. In antiquity, Thraco-Dacians inhabited the region, and after 279 BC Celts conquered the city, naming it Singidūn. It was conquered by the Romans during the reign of Augustus, and awarded city rights in the mid 2nd century. It was settled by the Slavs in the 520s, and changed hands several times between the Byzantine Empire, Frankish Empire, Bulgarian Empire and Kingdom of Hungary before it became the capital of Serbian King Stephen Dragutin (1282–1316). In 1521, Belgrade was conquered by the Ottoman Empire and became the seat of the Sanjak of Smederevo. It frequently passed from Ottoman to Habsburg rule, which saw the destruction of most of the city during the Austro-Ottoman wars. Belgrade was again named the capital of Serbia in 1841. Northern Belgrade remained the southernmost Habsburg post until 1918, when the city was reunited. As a strategic location, the city was battled over in 115 wars and razed to the ground 44 times. Belgrade was the capital of Yugoslavia (in various forms of governments) from its creation in 1918, to its final dissolution in 2006.

Belgrade has a special administrative status within Serbia and it is one of five statistical regions of Serbia. Its metropolitan territory is divided into 17 municipalities, each with its own local council. It covers 3.6% of Serbia’s territory, and 22.5% of the country’s population lives in the city. The city has been awarded many titles, and the nomination for European Capital of Culture 2020.

Houseboats on Ada Ciganlija
Extreme sports are available, such as bungee jumping, water skiing, and paintballing. There are numerous tracks on the island, where it is possible to ride a bike, go for a walk, or go jogging. Apart from Ada, Belgrade has total of 16 islands on the rivers, many still unused. Among them, the Great War Island at the confluence of Sava, stands out as an oasis of unshattered wildlife (especially birds). These areas, along with nearby Small War Island, are protected by the city’s government as a nature preserve. Tourist income is annually around 800 million Euros. In 2012, Belgrade visited 976.674 registered tourists.From that number 771.299 were foreign. Also more than 100.000 tourists arrive by 850 river cruisers.

Belgrade has a reputation for offering a vibrant nightlife; many clubs that are open until dawn can be found throughout the city. The most recognizable nightlife features of Belgrade are the barges (splav), spread along the banks of the Sava and Danube Rivers.

Belgrade nightlife on riverclubs.
Many weekend visitors—particularly from Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Slovenia—prefer Belgrade nightlife to that of their own capitals, due to a perceived friendly atmosphere, great clubs and bars, cheap drinks, the lack of language difficulties, and the lack of restrictive night life regulation.
Famous alternative clubs include Akademija and the famed KST (Klub Studenata Tehnike), located in the basement of the University of Belgrade Faculty of Electrical Engineering. One of the most famous sites for alternative cultural happenings in the city is the SKC (Student Cultural Centre), located right across from Belgrade’s highrise landmark, the Beograđanka. Concerts featuring famous local and foreign bands are often held at the center. SKC is also the site of various art exhibitions, as well as public debates and discussions.

Skadarlija, the city’s old bohemian neighbourhood
A more traditional Serbian nightlife experience, accompanied by traditional music known as Starogradska (roughly translated as Old Town Music), typical of northern Serbia’s urban environments, is most prominent in Skadarlija, the city’s old bohemian neighborhood where the poets and artists of Belgrade gathered in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Skadar Street (the centre of Skadarlija) and the surrounding neighbourhood are lined with some of Belgrade’s best and oldest traditional restaurants (called kafanas in Serbian), which date back to that period. At one end of the neighbourhood stands Belgrade’s oldest beer brewery, founded in the first half of the 19th century. One of the city’s oldest kafanas is the Znak pitanja.
The Times reported that Europe’s best nightlife can be found in buzzing Belgrade. In the Lonely Planet “1000 Ultimate Experiences” guide of 2012, Belgrade was placed at the 1st spot among the top 10 party cities in the world.

Cycling Along Europes Rivers Bicycle Touring Made Easy and Affordable

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16 thoughts on “Cycling Along Europe’s Rivers: Bicycle Touring Made Easy and Affordable

  1. 25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Must Have Book for Any Travel Cyclist, December 19, 2012
    By 
    Wendy

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Cycling Along Europe’s Rivers: Bicycle Touring Made Easy and Affordable (Paperback)
    My husband and I are avid cyclists and each summer we plan a 4-5 week bike trip to various countries throughout Europe. It is always a challenge to plan these trips because of the limited number of decent books that are available when designing your own personalized trip. Well, we hit the jackpot when we purchased Cycling Along Europe’s Rivers, by Michael J. Lyons. It is without a doubt one of best cycling travel books on the market. What puts Michael Lyon’s book at the five star-level is how he has imparted so much essential information into this 337- page book. He includes distances for the various trips, level of difficulty, and detailed descriptions of the routes. Our trip this year involves cycling from the North Sea to Prague. Author, Michael Lyon provides alternate routes, so we have the option to explore Berlin, Hamburg Loop, or other areas of the Czech Republic. The route details are clear and concise and include ride highlights, which help you decide if you really want to ride to this destination. He offers excellent suggestions for museums, places to dine, and where to sleep and website links are included. Best of all, he uses bikeline maps, which are the finest European cycling maps on the market. We have already cycled a number of the routes included in his book and the information was spot on!! Even though we are very seasoned travel cyclists we felt his trip preparation and safety pointers were outstanding and we gleaned a few more travel tips that we will use this summer. If this is your first attempt at cycle touring or even if you are a well-seasoned traveler, we highly recommend you purchase this book. Happy travels and may the wind always be at your back! Wendy & Jeff
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  2. 14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Useful, But Not At Level Of Most Guide Books, August 1, 2013
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Cycling Along Europe’s Rivers: Bicycle Touring Made Easy and Affordable (Paperback)
    The content in Cycling Along is decent, but more a starting point than anything else. There’s a ton of black and white filler photo’s and wasted page space. There are directions for 25 river cycling routes, At the end of each chapter there is mention of the Esterbauer book needed for the route, so one could just get the Esterbauer books and skip this one. Or go to the Radweg-Reisen website for ideas. Or go to the Fietsroute website. The Cicerone books are more useful, but not dedicated to river routes. Lonely Planet has some excellent bike guides for different European countries.

    Travel and cycling guide books is a crowded field, and this self published book, while useful, is not up to the standards of the competition. The specific focus on river routes is the main differentiator, but not enough to justify the rather steep price. CAER should be aggressively edited, printed at the size of the Cicerone books, and priced at one half. When I received this book, I was disappointed because it wasn’t up to the standards that all the five star reviews had suggested. I dug into the reviews and found that as of 8-8-13, 9 out of 21 reviews were post by reviewers who had no other reviews. Look for yourself and decide on the legitimacy of those reviews.

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  3. I know some Croatian as I visited there a couple of times. I know it is similar to Serbian so would I be ok using it or better off just sticking to English.

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  4. Leider haben wir hier in Deutschland auch Gedankenmanipulation und Gedankenüberwachung a l Bengt Nölting Patent von wem auch immer. Dumm nur, dass damit auch Fernmorde durchgeführt werden. Somit stimmt es schon, dass Gedanken nicht unwichtig sind zumindest für andere. Willkommen im Electronic Harassment und brain-to-brain communication. Also nicht wundern, wenn einem das Remote Neural Monitoring einen nachts via Zittern der Nerven / Muskeln begegnet. ………Ist halt U.S. Drohnen DDR 2.0. http://www.bookwriter0815.wordpress.com

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