Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack

Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack

Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack
@ The Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack mounts to the back of your bicycle to help you easily transport all of your items. This durable steel rack can carry up to 55 lbs. and is perfect for use with panniers, backpacks, baskets, and more! It is adjustable for 26in or 28in bicycle tires and features a universal fitting set. A reflector bracket and spring flap are also includedThe Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack mounts to the back of your bicycle to help you easily transport your gear. This durable steel rack can carry up to 55 pounds, and is ideally used with panniers, backpacks, baskets, and more. It’s adjustable for 26- or 28-inch bicycle tires and features a universal fitting set. A reflector bracket and spring flap are also included.

  • Rack mounts to back of your bicycle to help you easily transport your gear
  • Durable steel rack can carry up to 55 pounds
  • Ideally used with panniers, backpacks, baskets, etc.
  • Adjustable for 26- or 28-inch bicycle tires and features universal fitting set
  • Reflector bracket and spring flap are also included

List Price: $ 19.99

Price:

Bicycle Storage Rack

I snapped photos on my phone before I thought to make something for my channel.

The rack was incredibly tough to cut so needed a good angle grinder and then the rough bits tidied with a dremel tool

I had decided to do this as I wasn’t happy with the way soft luggage looks on a bike nor the fact it can be easily broken into

Made with open source software (Kdenlive)

Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack

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2 thoughts on “Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack

  1. 282 of 294 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The best, May 31, 2009
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack (Sports)

    People into light bikes will naturally prefer aluminum racks. But…

    This is made out of solid steel bar, not tubing. The flat ends are forged, not flattened tube. If the $30 aluminum tube racks are rated at 40 pounds, then this one should be rated over 100 lbs. (A sticker on it says do not use over 20 kilogram, which is 44 lbs. I think.) Not that I or my bike could seriously manage 100 pounds added … but I have loaded up 50 pounds of lawn fertilizer at times.

    The short bars that bridge the rack to the stays would have fit better in my case if they were straighter, so I tried to reshape one in a big steel vise, but regardless of what I did the bar only bent slightly and sprung back as soon as the pressure was off. Maybe if I put a three foot pipe on the end it would have bent, but the pressure was already crazy and I thought that was ill advised. 🙂 That is some good steel.

    The weak points obviously would be the welds, not the bars, but the welds look nice to me. I figure the weight rating has something to do with lawyers. If you load a lot of weight on the rear of a bike, the handling is completely off and squirrelly, and the rack manufacturer would get sued in the case of an accident if he did not recommend against it. 20kg is probably what stands up in court, not what the rack will hold. Since I broke a rack (from metal fatigue at the stays mount), which this one replaces, I was looking for something tough, and this looks like it. Thanks to the first posters that put up such informative pictures.

    I thought the rack might slip around at the screw joints (many racks are one piece welded), but it doesn’t. The whole rack flexes in a springy way if you push hard, but the screw joints do not move around. Just in case, I added some lock washers, which should take up any slack due to winter-summer thermal cycling. The rack already comes with lock nuts, but lock nuts are good mainly because when they become loose they will not rattle looser.

    Since I had some experience with helping someone with a nice aluminum rack switching from one bike to another, I was aware of how hard it is to adapt to every particular bike. That rack had an array of extra screws and brackets, but it still took some home-made weirdness to make it work on that particular bike. You can see how different the rack fits on my bike as compared to the other pics.

    I didn’t mention in the picture notes that the gripper material under the pipe brackets is a strip of material they use in wood working to keep small pieces of wood from sliding (without a vice) when routing (which is why I have it.) It looks like the same stuff sold as kitchen drawer liner that keeps silverware from sliding around when you open and close the drawers.

    The smallest pipe brackets (1/2 inch), though sturdy, were a bit too large even after re-bent, which is why I put some plastic pipe as a spacer around the stays.

    Since, when I find a really good item at a really good price, either the price immediately gets jacked up, or the item disappears never to be seen again, I got two just in case. But I think my bike will give out before this thing does.(And then I’ll have a new one for my new bike!) I am more enthusiastic about this item now that I have it then when I ordered it, which is practically a new experience for me.

    —-> added

    May 1, 2011

    I see pages of reviews after the last time I checked. I read them all (around 50.)

    Nothing has rattled loose, nothing bent or kinked, no welds gave out, nothing rusted. The rack is as sturdy and durable as I figured -cross my fingers- 2 years ago. When the weather is over 40 degrees here I do my grocery runs two or three times a week on the bike, and the rack gets a lot of flexing because the “milk crate” box is on top, which is a lot of leverage. In colder weather, grocery runs drop down to about once a week. About weekly I carry 2 gallons of milk in the grocery load.

    I am wondering what a number of people have in mind who say the rack is flimsy, unless it is not the same rack. I have never seen a normal rack (like under $70) that this one doesn’t beat the bleep out of for strength. Maybe aluminum is less springy? Or they have no experience with another rack?

    I do not get why people did not believe that there are NO bolts included that hold the rack to the bike and realistically NO instructions, which I understood from the people that reviewed this even earlier than me.

    About the first guy that posted left pictures of what you get. (If these are not present in your package, you were shorted, which quite a few later buyers have been.) If you don’t already see how you are going to attach the thing from those pictures, and you aren’t creative mechanically, or don’t want to be, be kind to yourself and don’t get involved.

    Believe it or not I did not buy this…

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  2. 73 of 80 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Adequate bargain carrier rack with a few shortcuts / costcuts, April 2, 2009
    By 
    Rick V (IN) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Ventura Universal Bicycle Carrier Rack (Sports)
    Background you can skip
    In our area, as part of the infrastructure development, the city put in bicycle paths all the way out to the mall / supermarkets and we can get to the bicycle path right behind our house.
    So wifey wanted to start using her bike to go and get groceries on her bike and do it more frequently. This would be great: cleaner air, burn calories and good exercize. Purrrrfect. Problem is: her bike has no carrier rack and she’d need Panniers that would work for her. So I set out, being the bargain hunter and all, to fix these problems as cheaply and efficiently as possible. After much looking and reading I decided on this rack combined with Avenir Metro III Panniers (2,200 cubic inches, see other review).

    About assembling this rack
    Since this rack is the only one I could find under 10$ it obviously cuts some cost-corners: one of those corners is assembly.
    I posted pictures of how the item arrives: a bunch of screws and relatively heavy grade metal parts in a bag that you assemble. The assembly instructions are not terribly clear but the picture of the finished product is sufficient to properly insert the screws. Do not tighten until fitted on the bike as you will need to decide the right angle and use of the extension pieces to get it all to work out. Note that this item, albeit heavy quality is not as adjustable (especially height) as some of the other more expensive items out there but the item is certainly heavy quality that can carry a full load of groceries.
    Assembly to the rear axle is similar to all the other brands and you need to BYOS (s=Screws). This is not convenient but the other more expensive brands have the same concept.

    Pros
    – Cheap!
    – Medium duty, fine for carrying groceries
    – Could carry panniers with 2 gallons of milk and cans etc without getting wobbly
    – (More a function of the velcro and loops on the Panniers:) able to easily saddle and fix the Panniers
    – Built in spring clamp to hold some towels or so
    – Has rear reflector or light-plate

    Cons
    – height cannot be adjusted on the legs. You need to get it level by using the connection pieces and holes for the saddle neck or frame connection pieces (left hand pieces). Worked out fine though and would fit other bikes I had as well. But took 1 star off for that.
    – Assembly is simple but for not-so-handy could be unclear with the frame connection pieces (upper left in Amazon pics)
    – Connection to axle was tricky as I could not get the right scew to hold but did that in the end.

    Conclusion:
    If you want a basic rack that does not need more than 10 to 15 pounds load capacity on a basic bike then this is a great deal. Add a few bags and enjoy. Great deal for 10$ or so.

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